Linus the Land Yacht: Episode 9 – Escape Hatch Part 2


Having completely removed the original hatch and custom built this new one, this two-part episode documents and discusses that process.

This second part to the hatch coverage finds me below decks this time, relaxing against my future kitchen table, and discussing just how to put together your own roof, and the pitfalls one might find in the process.

Altogether, it’s an easy build, so long as you measure, remeasure and cut precisely. This is one area on the bus that you won’t want to tackle if you don’t have any carpentry experience.

Please leave comments below if you’d like more info on this very important segment of a schoolie build.

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Linus the Land Yacht: Episode 8 – Escape Hatch Part 1


Having completely removed the original hatch and custom built this new one, this two-part episode documents and discusses that process.

In Part 1, below, I find myself in the storage facility, working on top of my gawd-awefully hot roof in the midday heat. Windy, though it might have been on the audio, I was enjoying the heat.

This episode talks about the hatch build out. I had to take out the original hatch because it had been weathered so badly that it leaked.

Removing it was not the hard part. Simplifying the rubber sheeting cuts so that it didn’t suffer the same leak problem – that was a different story.

Cutting out triangular pieces would sold the issue.

I hope that the techniques that I didscuss in this video help you out on your own respective builds. It was really kind of lucky that I fell into this little cheat. Coating it with flex Seal is definitely something I would not recommend skipping if you chose the same route.

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Linus the Land Yacht: Episode 7 – Front Couch


Though I later changed my mind on leaving this couch in the front, as the rear of the bus was much more suitable, I thought I’d go ahead and release this episode as well, just for you guys curious to start the build on your own couch – wherever it may end up.

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Linus the Land Yacht: Episode 6 – Building the Wheel well boxes


So, out of necessity of both insulation as well as making a flat surface out of a rounded, plastic edge, I built out boxes over each of the wheel wells.

This was not a difficult process. Especially since the wheel wells rose exactly 5.5″ off the floor – which happens aalso to be the width of a 2×6″ beam of wood. And as luck would have it, one of my neighbors was redoing his pool deck, and getting rid of all the leftover lumber. This had the added benefit of having already withstood years of weathering, and lots of traffic.

What was left was essentially to make it square, to insulate it from the outside weather, and to cut out scrap pieces of plywood from the bed frame to cover and secure it for later use.

The only difficulty would be to shape, copy and cut the inside well support. To do this I simply laid out the final length of the 2×6 that would cover the aisle side of the well, trace the edges with a black marker and then cut out that section with a jigsaw.

On top of the driver’s side well would be the composting toilet – which I will discuss in a later video; and over the passanger’s side well would be both the sink and the on-demand hot water shower head.

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Linus the Land Yacht: Episode 5 – Walls


This is just a short video – more of a follow up to the two previous. In discussion style, I talk about the special build-outs and particular challenges I faced during my build.

Specifically, there was a C-channel that ran the length of the bus on which all the original benches mounted. I originally thought about taking this down and removing it. But there were two problems.

First, I didn’t know if I would later use it for needing to secure something to the channel – the frame or base for the wood stove was one of these potential future adds that may need more security than what I may have just from the fram alone.

Secondly, I was a little afraid that I would get halfway through removing it and find out that either the bolts went all the way through the walls to the outside (and somehow putteyed over), or made it through some of the spatter board only to stop midway – thereby never allowing me to fully remove it for lack of being able to clinch the nut on the other end.

In either case, it didn’t pose any more of a problem than to cut out the spacer for the channel in the studs and keep moving with the rest of the design. So off I went!

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Linus the Land Yacht: Episode 4 – Framing and Insulation Part 2


As for Part 2, the insulation largely reflected the work and effort in Part 1. Not hard. Just time consuming.

Insulation is a straightforward process. It’s the little tricks that you learn along the way that make things easier.

For instance, use scissors rather than a box cutter. This is more exacting, easier, and scissors don’t suffer the quickly dulling effect that razors do.

Secondly, cut about a half-inch over what you need. It’ll bunch up, but on a bus, remember that things wiggle around. This will keep it snug.

Thirdly, because your studs are not likely to be spaced 16″ on center, you’ll want to also keep some seam filler handy. This is often called spray foam. This will be necessary to ensure that your hard work won’t be wasted in those hard to reach places that cumulatively let in all those little drafts and make your heating and colling less efficient.

Remember this step BEFORE putting up your wall paneling. You’ll undoubtedly take them down later when you’re freezing your buttons off and find yourself forced into looking for all the cold spots.

Watch the video for the rest of the details.

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